Water fed pole

Hello, I’m looking to purchase a wfp. I’ve been researching it a bit here and there.

I get the basic gist of how it works just not sure which pole to get yet.

I want to do residential 2-3 stories but also commercial up to 6 if needed.

I think just the xero micro series would suffice to me as I don’t think I’ll be doing commercial 4 stories or above yet but who knows.

But my main question is what is your guys experience with the wfp. I know some of you pros religiously use and recommend it but is it worth dropping the $$$ for one.

If I can clean 2nd or 3rd story windows on the inside by tilting them in then is it even worth getting one?

However I’ve also had exterior only jobs where the customer didn’t let me inside or the windows didn’t tilt so I had to use a ladder… in that case I can see the pro of the pole.

I’m just interested to hear your guy’s experience for those that use it daily or have used it or whatever your experience is with one.

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You can call me anytime man

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Not all windows tilt in, so that’s a mute point.

You can clean frames as well as the glass quicker and easier.

Colonial windows are much easier with a WFP as you don’t have detail all of the sides and corners, just scrub scrub scrub- rinse, rinse, rinse.

When ladder sets are difficult because of landscaping then WFP is a great tool to have.

Oxidized frames bleed onto your squeegee, detail towel, your hands, etc. - makes a mess. With DI water you can scrub those frames (MONOFILAMENT BRUSH ONLY) and rinse well. *You may notice some of the paint washes off too! *You might have to wrap a DRY TOWEL on the tip of a pole and run along the top edge of oxidized frames to prevent white drips. (Change often).

35 foot pole should do nicely for up to 3 story. I also have a lighter weight 15 foot pole for easier lower windows.

Start with a 35 that you can add sections to later like the carbon fiber Tucker.

Not all windows clean well with a WFP, still many times you will need to Trad Clean.

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I have the Xero gold 30’. Super light , that’s all you need for residential is 30’. I Like this pole a lot.

I previously had an SLX-30 it’s heavier than the Xero gold , but was the pole to get at the time. You can buy xtra lengths down the road if you need more height.

I think I they come in 10’ sections.

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Just to put it out there, I’ve got 50’ of pole and unger DI tank, hose, and brush for $1500… we can even meet up somewhere halfway if you want I’d take $1300 for it all

Man I’m a WFP guy all the way. I completely respect traditional guys because that’s pure bred window cleaners. But the poles are so damn convenient.

I just got a Xero Destroyer 30’ and will get the extra 40’ attachment soon. We have a few hotels we do that are 4 stories and the cheaper Reach-it poles with extensions were like slinky noodles because they flexed so much. I’m excited to test out the more rigid Destroyer pole.

WCR has the limited time only lime green Xero 12’ trad pole that I just ordered today. I’m going to use that as my single story home water fed pole so I don’t have to separate the Destroyer all the time.

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A WFP can’t have the quality control of ‘nose to glass’, just not possible. With that in mind, if your customer’s expectations are fairly low then it can be a useful tool.

It was originally intended for bulk commercial glass but some resi cleaners decided to adopt it. I use mine on windows out of reach by a ladder, or bulk thermal french panes that I’ve previously cleaned by hand. Results have been mixed.

I can get anything off of glass with a wfp that I can
get off with trad window mop and squeegee.
Plus I can clean frames quicker and easier with a wfp

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They’re definitely worth it. I built mine for around $650.

These two videos are good resources I used:

(@Pure_Water_Window_Cl shoutout and thx)

They’re definitely worth it. Really nice to have the option to WFP for various scenarios. (Almost) No one is laddering 40 ft anymore.

I am not all that handy in regards to building things, so don’t count yourself out. I went for it and am satisfied with the first effort.

If you don’t build one, totally get it, buy a used system our peers periodically offer, or the newer RO/DI World Enterprises system WCR just came out with to start.

My take- go with RO/DI.

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I wholeheartedly disagree with this statement. I use my WFP on many repeat quarterly customers and it does a fine job - not just acceptable, but a fine job. Easier to clean frames; easier to clean when you run across oxidized frames. It won’t remove paint and old stucco, but it will remove bird poo and regular dirty windows. If you have other very stubborn debris that is even hard or laborsome to clean the traditional way, then you will have to get nose to glass.

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Exactly , I wouldn’t be using a wfp if strip washer and squeegee did a better job. I use my wfp on almost every job . The only thing it can’t do is scrape . You could attach a scraper to the brush , but I don’t like scraping windows that way.
With trad cleaning you scrub the glass with your strip washer , with WFP cleaning you scrub the glass with a brush . Both loosen the dirt . With trad cleaning you squeegee the windows to remove the loose dirt . With WFP cleaning you rinse the loose dirt away. No detailing with WFP cleaning . You have to detail with Trad cleaning

That was my George Carlin skit. Lol :joy:.

I missed my calling. If I could of just got over the stage fright

WFP cleaning is Football BTW

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you are talking about 2 different uses.

i bought poles that are designed for residential because that is what i do mostly and i use wfp for ALL exterior glass.

GARRY’S BACK!!!

Nice to see your original profile posting on there :smiley:

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I use waterfed every day on almost every job. I beg to differ.

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Yeah I have to also disagree.
As someone who has been in the industry since 1996, I was a hardcore traditional, even back in 2010 when the company I worked for first introduced us to them I didn’t like them I guess for a while I never really understood exactly how they worked, as workers we were just shown how to use it not explained how it worked.
It wasn’t until I got my own set up in about 2014-15 that I was able to see the benefit, but to be completely honest back then the brushes that were available were not doing a fantastic job in the corners on in really dirty bottoms of deeper windows.

I feel now with the swivels and the rinse bars with scrubber attachments and what now in many instances WFP will and does do a BETTER job than trad. I do 95% of external with WFP and its not just because its faster and easier its mainly because of the results.

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No judgement here, but:

I would wager your mixed results are likely a product of your lack of regular WFP use, more than the WFP itself. Personally I’ve found that similar to trad work, there’s a learning curve YouTube technique vids can cut that down, but nothing beats putting brush to glass and learning what works and what doesn’t.

Additionally, if you lack faith in the system, I suspect you haven’t invested the time/money into acquiring the best equipment. It’s amazing what a legit Tucker boar’s hair brush can do that a cheap nylon brush can’t. (Pro’s and cons even there, but as far as aggressive debris removal many find that the way to go.) But, you’re looking at $125+ for a brush. I find it worth it, because the results are excellent; but if I viewed it through a skeptic’s eye, I may not.

Just my 2 cents.

You have 2 poles? Why not just use the 35 foot one for the lower story, can you remove the sections and use that one for lower?

I payed $450 and $400 for brushes recently, when my older customers aslk oh wow how come so fast this time, I tell them its literally because of my $450 brushes and my new 4 stage filtration system.

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I got tired of constantly separating my 30’ pole to use for single story. And if you use the complete pole the added weight can fatigue you when its not necessary to use the full pole.

I use two poles also. Its nice to have the option to grab a smaller pole for single story instead of lugging a complete pole around.

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Most newer poles out there these days are sectional, meaning you can pull out 1, 3 ,5 or sometimes all sections and just use what you need.

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